2008/05/20

CatWoman #77 Review



Catwoman # 77 Review
By EvilOmar on March 21, 2008 10:32 AM | Permalink
Writer: Will Pfeiffer
Penciller: David Lopez
Inker: Alvaro Lopez
Cover: Adam Hughes
Most of the time Adam Hughes’ covers don’t really bother me. They usually don’t have anything to do with the interior of the book. Half naked women with T&A everywhere, but hey he’s just doing what the editor tells him to do. While this issue is a tie-in with Salvation Run, with the exception of Joker, none of those villains make an appearance. I wonder how his All Star Wonder Woman is coming along? He’s been working on that since 2006?
While Pfeiffer manages to keep his title character in the spotlight amidst all the crossovers and tie-ins and this Salvation Run tie-in is no exception. Selina is still trapped in her fantasy world of Gotham City. Where she can do anything like take out Batman, Green Lantern, Flash, and even knock out Superman. Martian Manhunter reveals to her that it’s just her own mind she is in, not another world like she thought. She eventually breaks free of the machine and now must find a way off this hell planet.
I’ve always enjoyed comics like this. Where we dive deep into the subconscious mind of the lead character and find their perfect world. Three issues is kind of pushing it though, even though watching Selina single handedly take town members of the JLA was fun to see. I love the way that David Lopez handles these scenes too. While they are comical; they also remain dynamic. I hope they wrap up the SR tie-in with next issue so Pfeiffer can keep telling the stories he wants to tell. A-

http://aboutheroes.com/2008/03/catwoman-77-review.php


Well, I knew it had to happen sometime – a crossover tie-in would eventually harm Will Pfeifer's Catwoman. Somehow, someway, Pfeifer continued to deliver the goods through a series of Amazons Attack and Countdown tie-ins, but it looks like Salvation Run has finally succeeded in derailing, at least temporarily, this consistently fantastic series.
There are a number of reasons why this recent arc hasn't made the mark, but the main one is the way Pfeifer decided to seclude Selina from the rest of the Prison Planet's villainous population and more or less remove her from the Salvation Run board. In essence, Pfeifer spent two issues giving us a story that takes place entirely within Selina's mind, and these types of internal tales usually lack a level of substance, depth and relevance. Considering Selina's subconscious struggle lacks any real sense of emotion and plays out in physical confrontations, it's not surprising that these past two installments added little to either Catwoman or Salvation Run's greater stories. After reading the brilliant first issue in this recent arc, which saw Catwoman right in the mix with the DCU's most famous psychopaths, it's hard not to wonder why Pfiefer went in this direction.
That all isn't to say that this issue is all bad. Watching Selina single-handedly take down Batman and then every hero in the DCU in her own imagination is a lot of fun, and artist David Lopez (one of my favorite superhero artists currently working) knocks these scenes out of the park. The problem is, we're fully aware that these battles are taking place within Selina's imagination, and we begin to lose interest around the time she knocks around the forth or fifth A-list hero. Worse, when it comes time for Selina to decide whether to leave her virtual reality for that of the Hell planet, Pfeifer brushes over the scene far too quickly. I hope there was a point to removing Selina from the rest of the Salvation Run gang other than to prevent Pfeifer from stepping on that series' toes.
Pfeifer and Lopez's Catwoman is at its absolute finest when it's focused squarely on Catwoman's never-ending moral tightrope walk between good and evil, and at first, Salvation Run seemed like an opportunity to put Selina in a crazy situation while exploring that central moral dilemma. But it hasn't, really. At least not in these past two issues, which spun their wheels a little too much for my liking.

http://comics.ign.com/articles/860/860942p1.html


CATWOMAN #77 REVIEW
Reviewer: Terry Verticchio terryvert@hotmail.com
Quick Rating: Very good
Title: Waking Up on the Wrong Side of the Universe—Part Three
Catwoman is in for the biggest fight of her life…against herself.
Writer: Will Pfeifer
Pencils: David Lopez
Inks: Alvaro Lopez
Colours: Jeromy Cox & Guy Major
Letters: Jared K. Fletcher
Cover artist: Adam Hughes
Editor: Nachie Castro
Publisher: DC Comics
Selina is still trapped in her fantasyland Gotham City. There she can do anything, be anything and she is no longer afraid of anything. Unfortunately it is a lie and what’s worse is that Selina knows it’s a lie. But then some lies are the most beguiling. It will take all of her cunning and strength to break free of such a world. Does she have what it takes to give up her dreams?
I have to give Will Pfeifer credit, as he certainly knows how to juggle all of the DC’s Big Events like OYL, Amazons Attack and now Salvation Run, and still maintain a tight control over this title and the character. This story isn’t the best one I’ve ever read, but the fact that he managed to make something profound out being saddled with Salvation Run makes me give Will top marks. I bet he can’t wait until this all blows over and he can go back writing his own stories again.
The art is like the writing, the very epitome of consistency.
Well, if Selina can free herself from her latest setback she still has to deal with the fact that she’s marooned on an alien planet populated by vicious killers and lunatics. But then she wouldn’t be Catwoman if she let little things like that bring her down.

http://www.comixtreme.com/forums/showthread.php?t=39866


CATWOMAN #77
Writer: Will Pfeifer
Artist: David Lopez
Inker: Alvaro Lopez
Publisher: DC Comics
Reviewer: Rock-Me Amodeo
Is it just my imagination, or has this book been rocking solidly for quite some time?
Toward the end of the last issue, I was prepared for a crappy ending. I just knew when we saw that strange Batman, the blurb for the next issue would have those five dreaded words somewhere in the title: “The Search For Ray Palmer.” I would curse production schedules and bad editing and…and…it was not that at all. Selena was in “The Matrix,” sorta, a matrix of her own mind, and she was the Neo.
And when that wicked smile crossed her lips at the end of the book, an exact duplicate was on my face as well. All I really wanted to see this issue was Selena connecting her seven pound boots to an endless row of latex-covered posteriors.
Boy, did I get that. Sure, I knew it would come to an end, but what a lot of fun! And you know, it made me seriously wonder if perhaps Catwoman is not selling herself short. Based on the extremely plausible choreography in this one, I bet she could do pretty well if she could somehow pull a Black Canary/Shiva maneuver. Something to hope for, although I’m sure she’s a better thief than either one of them, and maybe that’s where her strengths need to stay.
Still, a great book, and even more impressive considering that Pfeifer had to stay within the editorial mandates of Selena being off in SALVATION RUN. Yeah, having your main character tied to a mini-series, that couldn’t go bad, huh? But it didn’t.
And David Lopez is getting a little better each issue. Sure, he doesn’t draw Selina the way Hughes does the covers, but who wants a heroine who looks like a cross between Audrey Hepburn and Jennifer Love Hewitt, every panel? Okay, I wouldn’t cry, but if Hughes could do that every panel, he’d be drawing the book and Lopez would be doing the covers. As it is, Lopez brings a great story. Also, hats off to the colorists, who made an effort to convey the dream-like quality of the story with their palette, and succeeded.
I know I have a weakness for chick books. But truth be told, it’s only a weakness for well-written, well-drawn chick books. Between this, BIRDS OF PREY, BUFFY and MS. MARVEL, my plate is full.

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/36152


Catwoman #77 - DC
Luckily, the Martian Manhunter is on the Salvation Run planet, because if not . . . I think Catwoman would've died in that machine that she became attached to. It focused on her desires . . returning to Gotham . . and then amplified her needs and concerns. She thinks that she's on an alternative Earth. And why not? Batman's told her those stories before. She has no reason to think that things may be of her own design, because everything is askew compared to what they would be like at home. Batman carries a gun, she's a murderous felon feared by . . well, everyone . . and she seems to be very strong and near invulnerable. The problem is, the longer she stays hooked up, the more life-force that's drained from her. And, the only way to unhook herself . . . she has to decide to leave. We saw in the last issue of Salvation Run, #5, what happens to her after she gets out and returns to camp. So this issue basically filled in the pieces in-between. Will Preifer writes this book, with David and Alvaro Lopez on the art. Which is the usual. It was kind of neat seeing another alternative Earth, although this one was just a dream, but it was also good to get back to the real world again. Well . . the real world that isn't her world. The first thing she notices when she gets out is how different the sky looks. It makes her long for Gotham even more. Hopefully this Salvation Run story-line will be over soon. We need to get Catwoman back in Gotham. I'm kind of thinking though, that this trip so far away from home, is going to make her re-evaluate her position on Helena and her future. That's just my guess though. I'm thinking her maternal instincts are going to come out. Guess we'll wait and see.

http://comicinsight.blogspot.com/2008/04/catwoman-77-dc.html


Catwoman #77
W: Will Pfeifer
A: David Lopez
I’m not really sure what the deal is with Adam Hughes’ cover for this issue. With the exception of the Joker (who shows up on the final page) none of the characters “chasing” Selina are anywhere in the book. Also, I’m not sure how accurate the tag-line “Run Catwoman Run” is. Does she run in this issue? I say: “Not really.” In fact, not only doesn’t Catwoman run, but she’s almost tempted to stay in the crazy alien holodeck forever.
And, I’ll be honest, I don’t blame her. Sure, the machine she’s in is killing her. But, the alternate reality that it’s created for her is pretty sweet. People fear her and give her free shit. And, not only that, in this world, she can actually take out Batman, Superman, Green Lantern and Flash. You don’t see that every day. But, then Martian Manhunter shows up and throws a huge wet blanket on everything. (It’s taken me a while, but I’ve finally learned to love J’onn’s new pointy-headed, all-business look.) “You’re going to die,” he says, “This world isn’t real.” But wait, what’s J’onn doing there, you ask? That is a very good question. It seems that Bruce sent J’onn to the prison planet undercover in the guise of Blockbuster. That Bruce, always thinking.

http://thefaust.wordpress.com/2008/03/22/weekly-comic-review-for-31908/


Catwoman #77 Review by Joey Esposito
Writer - Will Pfeifer
Pencils - David Lopez
Inks - Alvaro Lopez
Colors - Jeromy Cox & Guy Major
Letters - Jared K. Fletcher
Cover - Adam Hughes
Any week that Catwoman comes out is usually a good week. I can always rely on Selina Kyle for cocky, snarky banter and plenty of gritty action. What I don't typically expect is alternate worlds and hell planets. I will say that Will Pfeifer has handled Catwoman's tie in to Salvation Run exceptionally, even sending her off to a Gotham City of her own creation in the past two issues. And while it was entertaining to see Selina knock out Superman, it's hard to feel as though this wasn't just a waste of story.
There is plenty underlying here; this world that Selina has created sees her as the world's most feared killer and completely invulnerable. If she has created this world, what kind of dark thoughts lay dormant inside of her? Time will tell if Pfeifer uses this kind of an angle in future issues, but for now it provides enough food for thought that makes this issue seem like less of a waste. As seems to be the trend with DC books as of late, this issue is a tagalong on a larger story that is yet to be told.
Delightful as always is the world of David and Alvaro Lopez, who are quickly beginning to define this book for me. Pfeifer's writing may be recognizable, but when I look back on these issues years from now, it's going to be their work that I remember. The panel structures are so simple yet the evoke a cinematic feel to them, that while it's completely different from the noir-like style that Darwyn Cooke and Ed Brubaker had when this series first re-launched, it still fits the book in every way. Hopefully soon, the Lopez's can stop drawing hell planets and return to the mean streets of the East End of Gotham.
2.5 out of 5.

http://www.cincity2000.com/content/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1076


CATWOMAN #77
Written by Will Pfeifer
Art by David Lopez and Alvaro Lopez
I give Catwoman a lot of praise and has deserved it ever since Brubaker and Cooke relaunched the title, but there's very little Pfeifer can do with this editorial mandated Salvation Run tie-in arc. I'm honestly impressed with how he's managed to skirt the issue here and try and go off on his own and ignore the entire thing while still technically being there.
I refer, of course, to this little mishap with the alien computers that resulted in a fun romp through Selina's "ideal" Earth where she can take down the entire Justice League by herself and just ignore all the problems and tragedies that have built up in her life over the past couple years. It's still the product of a tie-in to a terrible story and this arc could very well be considered pure filler that doesn't really matter in the grand scheme of things, but it's still enjoyable enough and this little sidetrip shouldn't be looked at as a total loss. I can see a newcomer being disappointed with the book based on the last couple issues, but I hope they stick around until we get back to Earth or go back and pick up some earlier trades to see what the book is really like.
Verdict - Check It

http://www.weeklycrisis.com/2008/03/weekly-crisis-quick-shot-comic-book_20.html


Catwoman #77: Can we get Selina back to reality? There were some good character building moments in this issue, but if I have to read about Catwoman in an virtual reality I should only have to buy it with virtual cash.

http://www.spacebooger.com/index.php/2008/03/24/last-week-in-comics-amazing-spider-man-554-was-better-the-first-time-as-the-death-of-superman/


CATWOMAN #77
COVER TAGLINE: Run Catwoman Run
TITLE: Waking Up On the Wrong Side of the Universe Part 3
STORY ARC: None
RELEASE DATE: March, 2007
COVER DATE: May, 2008
WRITER: Will Pfeifer
PENCILER(s): David Lopez
INKER(s): Alvaro Lopez
COLORS: Jeromy Cox
LETTERS: Jared K. Fletcher
EDITOR(s): Nachie Castro
COVER: Adam Hughes
PRICE: $2.99 U.S./$4.00 Canada
CHARACTERS: Catwoman (Selina Kyle); Batman; Superman; Green Lantern; Flash; Lex Luthor; Martian Manhunter
Facing off against a hovering Bat-Copter that is ready to fire at her, Catwoman quickly evaluates her situation. Abandoned on a dangerous Hell Planet she has somehow ended up in a world very much like her own that is (unbeknownst to her) actually a virtual reality matrix slowly sapping her life away. Deciding her course of action in an instant, Selina leaps in the air, crashes through the windshield and brings the entire Bat-Copter down.
After the crash landing, Selina rescues the unconscious Batman and steps inside an surreally placed coffee bar. The patrons all seem to be terrified of her and giver her whatever she asks for just to get her to leave.
While Catwoman is enjoying her java, the Justice League (summoned by Batman) prepare to take her down. This being her ideal dream world, Selina simply uses Bruce's kryptonite ring from his utility belt to knock out Superman and Green Lantern and uses Green Lantern's power ring to take off the charging Flash. Pleased with herself for effectively taking out the Justice League, Catwoman takes a moment to enjoy the cigar that Joker gave her back on Salvation Run.
Meanwhile, back in reality, Luthor is watching Catwoman hover in midair, reduced to a vegetative state by the life force stealing machine. After determining Selina to be a lost cause, Luthor leaves her to die. Hiding in the shadows, Martian Manhunter stays behind and taps into Selina's mind to beg her to let herself free from her own virtual prison.
Back in the machine, Catwoman is standing in a phone booth, perusing a phone book looking for her family members when she comes across the name of her daughter. Before she can dial the number she is called upon by Batman who now has nearly every hero of the DC Universe standing behind him ready to attack her. At this point, Martian Manhunter steps in and tells her that if she doesn't free herself she will die in the machine creating this fictional world. Still tempted of the possibility of a perfect life with her daughter, Catwoman takes a moment to look back at the phone booth.
Martian Manhunter then points out to Catwoman that while her attention was diverted, all of her enemies surrounding her have frozen including Batman. "Look at what happens when you're not focused on him. Nothing. Absolutely nothing happens because without you he doesn't exist. None of this does. She doesn't either. No matter how much you want her to."
Catwoman reaches out to test this theory and taps the frozen Batman in front of her. Batman falls to the ground and shatters into a million pieces. Catwoman pulls herself together and finally wills herself out of the machine. She crawls out of the bunker that was housing her and pauses for only one moment to realize that the cigar that she was able to enjoy in the machine has by now become busted in real life. Tossing the cigar and her ideal world behind her she makes her way back to the camp only to find a battle raging on between the Luthor and Joker factions!
NOTE:
See this battle and find out where Catwoman goes from here in Salvation Run #5

http://batmanytb.com/comics/titles/catwoman/vol2/0_100/newcat77.php


CATWOMAN #77
(Will Pfeiffer / David & Alvaro Lopez)
'Waking up On The Wrong Side of the Universe' pt 3
Selina is still trapped in the VR perfect world, while captured in the Salvation Run planet, and this time she's kicking the collective ass (you might notice i love using the phrase 'kick ass') of the Justice League - including Superman, Green Lantern and the Flash (in a semi-believable way, no less). It's sheer fun, but it reeks of fanboy enthusiasm, reading more like over-enthusiasticfan-fiction than an actual DC mag.
6.5/10

http://lysad.blogspot.com/2008/04/dc-capsule-reviews-week-12-2008.html


Catwoman #77
Wed, March 19th, 2008
A weak issue interrupts a strong run on the title for writer Will Pfeiffer. What plot device ruins the issue? Read on to find out.

http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=archive&type=user_review&id=0&offset=56


CATWOMAN #77
by Timothy Callahan
Enlarge
STORY BY
Will Pfeifer
ART BY
David Lopez, Alvaro Lopez
COLORS BY
Jeromy Cox, Guy Major
LETTERS BY
Jared K. Fletcher
COVER BY
Adam Hughes
PUBLISHER
DC Comics
COVER PRICE
$2.99 (USD)
RELEASE DATE
Wed, March 19th, 2008
Wed, March 19th, 2008 at 8:03PM PST
This series has come a long was since the early Ed Brubaker/Darwyn Cooke issues. What began as stylish noir comic has now become an outer space adventure. "Will Eisner’s Spirit" (the original series, not the Cooke one) followed the same trajectory, oddly enough, so Pfeifer and the Lopez brothers are in good company at least. And what Pfeifer has managed to do throughout his tenure on Catwoman has been impressive. He’s maintained the focus on character rather than spectacle, even when Selina Kyle has been running around punching costumed crooks or zooming to a far away prison planet.
"Catwoman" is one of those comics that I take for granted each month, and then when I read it I remember that it’s actually quite good. Unfortunately, this issue isn’t one of the best of Pfeiffer’s run.
The problem with this issue, and the issue preceding it, is that it’s all just a dream. The story doesn’t, ultimately, count. And that’s frustrating. I understand why writers (not just in comics) use dream sequences: to symbolically reveal the interior life of a character. It’s a pseudo-Freudian way to establish implicit desire without explicit words or actions. Pfeiffer spends two issues establishing Selina Kyle’s supernatural sense of confidence and her desire for a family, but is that anything new? Regular readers of the series can’t be surprised at all about what these dreams reveal. Perhaps the thrill is watching Catwoman dispatch more powerful heroes with her cunning, but since it’s all just a fantasy induced by some unexplained alien machinery, it doesn’t amount to much.
This issue, this story arc, seems like a missed opportunity. I assume Catwoman was chosen to be part of Salvation Run and Pfeiffer was directed to include her adventures on that alien planet as part of the ongoing "Catwoman" series. And perhaps Pfeifer thought the character didn’t belong in that kind of faux-"Secret Wars" context, so he contrived a two-issue dream sequence to get her out of it. That’s what it feels like. But Pfeifer’s Selina Kyle playing the villains against each other, using her wits to survive (and thrive) on a hostile alien planet? That sounds like an interesting story. And that’s not what we get. We get a lot of dream-sequence Catwoman running around beating up Batman while Martian Manhunter hovers behind her saying, “this isn’t real. It’s all in your mind.”
The art, as always, is excellent, but it’s just not enough to save the flawed concept of the issue. The story ends with Catwoman waking from her imposed dream state, though, so I have faith that Pfeifer will get the series back on track in no time.

http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=user_review&id=42


Biggest "I Have Conflicting Issues About This": Catwoman 77
I loved watching Selina kick ass through the JLA. Watching her beat up Batman in particular was fun.
But if she can be this great in her mind, why oh why can't she be this awesome the rest of the time?
Overall Score: 3.5/5
Doormat Score: 0/5

http://norprostitute.blogspot.com/2008/03/comics-this-week-other-than-countdown.html


Catwoman #77
W: Will Pfeifer
A: David Lopez
I’m not really sure what the deal is with Adam Hughes’ cover for this issue. With the exception of the Joker (who shows up on the final page) none of the characters “chasing” Selina are anywhere in the book. Also, I’m not sure how accurate the tag-line “Run Catwoman Run” is. Does she run in this issue? I say: “Not really.” In fact, not only doesn’t Catwoman run, but she’s almost tempted to stay in the crazy alien holodeck forever.
And, I’ll be honest, I don’t blame her. Sure, the machine she’s in is killing her. But, the alternate reality that it’s created for her is pretty sweet. People fear her and give her free shit. And, not only that, in this world, she can actually take out Batman, Superman, Green Lantern and Flash. You don’t see that every day. But, then Martian Manhunter shows up and throws a huge wet blanket on everything. (It’s taken me a while, but I’ve finally learned to love J’onn’s new pointy-headed, all-business look.) “You’re going to die,” he says, “This world isn’t real.” But wait, what’s J’onn doing there, you ask? That is a very good question. It seems that Bruce sent J’onn to the prison planet undercover in the guise of Blockbuster. That Bruce, always thinking.

http://thefaust.wordpress.com/tag/darkhorse/


CATWOMAN #77
Written by Will Pfeifer
Art by David Lopez and Alvaro Lopez
Can Catwoman stay one step ahead of every villain in the DCU? Looks like she's managed to tick off Luthor and the Joker, and her only chance of getting back to Gotham City lies in the hands of the one being on the planet she can trust. But can he trust her?
Kirk Says: Pfeifer has done an excellent job with Catwoman over the course of his run and I'm amazed at how well he's handling this editorially mandated Salvation Run off world tie-in arc. I doubt any of this will convince anyone to pick up one of DC's books though, so I won't waste my breath and will move on to the next title.

http://www.weeklycrisis.com/2008/03/post-crisis-comic-book-previews-for_18.html


PICK! CATWOMAN #77
Writer: Will Pfeifer
Penciller: David Lopez
Inker: Alvaro Lopez
Colorist: Jeremy Cox & Guy Major
Publisher: DC Comics
Samantha: When this issue starts, Selina is still trapped inside her “mental submission” box on the alien prison planet. As such, she believes she is in a world in which she can do anything she wants. This, for the reader, has the delightful side effect of letting her go through and kick everyone in the JLA’s butt. It is sheer gratuitous hero on hero violence at its best. As the story ends, however, both the reader and Selina realize that this is all just a figment of her mind trying to give her a perfect world to make up for the shambles of a life she has back home, and Selina vows that if she could pick up the pieces and determine her own fate in the fake version of her life, she can do so in real life, too. I hope so, because I would like to have a Selina I can root for again, like I used to pre-OYL and like I did in this issue.
Also, this issue made me care a lot more about the prison planet nonsense than the last two issues of JLA combined have.
SHOCK VALUE: B+

http://www.popcultureshock.com/picks-pans-march-19-2008/43492/


Catwoman #77- Selina believes herself to be on a parallel Earth where she is invincible. To be honest I gotta admit I kinda enjoyed watching her beating the crap out of Batman, Superman, AND Hal Jordan. Eventually Martian Manhunter shows up to tell Selina that she is still on the Hell Planet and this Earth she thinks she is on, is in fact a construct she herself is making up maintained by the machine she got trapped in on the Hell Planet. Eventually Selina with a little urging from MM wakes up from her dream world, and starts making her way back to the villains on the Hell Planet. This issue overall was not too shabby, I still feel like Pfeifer is treading water though till this whole Salvation Run mini-series is over. Dig the Lopez’s work on this book, gotta say in the beginning I was kinda meh about it, but now the artwork for this book just feels right.

http://comicoverload.com/?p=649


Catwoman #77 by Will Pfeifer (writer), David López (penciller), Álvaro López (inker), Jeromy Cox (colorist), Guy Major (colorist), and Jared K. Fletcher (letterer). $2.99, 22 pgs, FC, DC.
Selina’s seemingly-interminable stay on the Salvation Run Planet continues, and even though it’s only been three issues but feels like three years, there’s still one more issue to go! Someone last month bugged me about buying it and therefore validating this kind of crap, and that’s a point, but as I’ve often mentioned, if I know the detour is going to be brief, I’ll deal with it. Pfeifer has done such a good job with this book, and these issues, which are crappy in terms of entertainment, still give us a good portrayal of Selina, from her desire to stay in this weird world that exists only in her head to the way she thinks about taking down Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, and Flash. As the world is created just for her, it’s not impressive that she’s able to do it, but her thought process as she runs this gauntlet is interesting. But really, these have been pointless issues. J’onn, who told her last issue that it wasn’t real, shows up again to tell her it’s not real, and she can only get out if she wants to. So Selina wants to, and hey presto! she’s out. It’s not a bad idea for a one-off issue, but stretching it to two is pushing it. Oh well - one more issue to get Selina off the SRP, and then Pfeifer can get back to doing what has made this book one of DC’s best.
As I have nothing nice to say about the story, I should mention that López, as usual, does a stellar job with the art. The fight between Selina and the Justice Leaguers is very nicely done, and I’m always impressed by how well López shows Selina’s facial expressions, even though she spends a lot of time with her eyes hidden. He does a wonderful job with her mouth that conveys her emotions, and it’s greatly appreciated. Even if I don’t like the story of these past few issues, the art has been, as usual, top-notch. I’ll point out, once again, that López has drawn every issue for over two years, and the book is never late. I guess he’s just not a prima donna.

http://www.blogdimension.com/en/cache?s=36920337-what-i-bought-19-march-2008


Catwoman #77 – Writer Will Pfeifer, Pencils David Lopez, Inks Alvaro Lopez, Colors Jeromy Cox and Guy Major. Catwoman is trapped inside of a machine on the prison planet that is slowly killing her. In her mind she is on an alternate Earth and having a blast beating up half the JLA. The Martian Manhunter enters her mind and helps her realize what is going on and she escapes. It was a great adventure watching Selina being super powered and having the time of her life and it was almost sad that she had to leave. What is so great about this series is Will Pfeifer made this inane idea of having Catwoman on the prison planet work. David and Alvaro Lopez do great work on every issue and deliver this book on a monthly basis. These guys are top flight artists who pick great camera angles and can draw anything and anyone. I’m always worried DC will steal them for a higher profile title. Once again Catwoman was a very good issue. Will Pfeifer should be writing more comics.

http://comicsand.blogspot.com/2008/03/best-to-worst-of-last-week_25.html


Catwoman #77 - Another fun issue from Pfeifer & Lopez. How soon until someone at DC notices that Lopez has churned out the art on close to 2 years straight?

http://forums.comicbookresources.com/showthread.php?t=212086&page=3


Catwoman #77: This comic is just a lot of fun to read. I love how she's written. Her attitude and personality are just great. Nice to have everything explained in this issue. At first I was bothered by the fact that she was able to use Hals ring, but it all made sense in the end.

http://boards.ign.com/comics_general_board/b5033/160851055/p1/


Catwoman#77
by Will Pfeifer and David/Alvaro Lopez, gorgeous cover by Adam Hughes
I feel really bad, because I got some water on the cover, and I hate to ruin such a pretty cover, but don't pay attention to my neuroses. . .
An homage to Run, Lola, Run, I believe. The thing is, I wonder if Selina has to have so much rouge on her face; it makes her look younger/ more innocent than I think she should appear to be. As always, I love the whip being shown like a tail. That is so cute.
Enough about the cover, let's get to the comic itself. While this tie-in to Salvation Run isn't exactly the best of jumping-on points, it's definitely a fun read, because --
1) Batman tries apprehending Catwoman (in his very own Bat-copter!).
Fails.
2) Batman tries apprehending Catwoman again. (now with three other members of the Justice League!).
Fails.
3) Batman tries yet again, with the entire DCU behind him:
Well, I guess you can find out what happens by checking it out, hm? It has to do with Salvation Run and isn't that creative, since we're in the age of the Wachowskis, but it's still a really fun read.
Selina finds herself in a strange Earth, and makes the most of it. Here, on this Earth, she has super powers and everyone fears her, and what does she do with that? She has some coffee. --->
I like Catwoman's voice in the narration. It's very easygoing and friendly, and it's confident as well.
Good stuff, although I can't really expect any more substance from a forced tie-in.
Earlier I resolved to give the title some trial issues, and I haven't regretted it, though after this arc I'm sure we'll get to see more substance. Three out of five bruised and bandaged Batmen.

http://chezkevin.blogspot.com/2008/03/cover-to-cover.html


PICK! CATWOMAN #77
Writer: Will Pfeifer
Penciller: David Lopez
Inker: Alvaro Lopez
Colorist: Jeremy Cox & Guy Major
Publisher: DC Comics
Samantha: When this issue starts, Selina is still trapped inside her “mental submission” box on the alien prison planet. As such, she believes she is in a world in which she can do anything she wants. This, for the reader, has the delightful side effect of letting her go through and kick everyone in the JLA’s butt. It is sheer gratuitous hero on hero violence at its best. As the story ends, however, both the reader and Selina realize that this is all just a figment of her mind trying to give her a perfect world to make up for the shambles of a life she has back home, and Selina vows that if she could pick up the pieces and determine her own fate in the fake version of her life, she can do so in real life, too. I hope so, because I would like to have a Selina I can root for again, like I used to pre-OYL and like I did in this issue.
Also, this issue made me care a lot more about the prison planet nonsense than the last two issues of JLA combined have.
SHOCK VALUE: B+

http://www.popcultureshock.com/pcs/columns/picks-and-pans/


CATWOMAN #77: I've complained long and (I'm sure) tediously about Selina being involved in this Salvation Run business, but for once I enjoyed this issue- I mean, geez- it was fun seeing her kick Batman's ass for the second time, then follow that up with sizable portions of the Justice League as well. Of course, and I spoil here, it was all in her mind as it turns out...but no less fun for it. That said, I'll be glad when this crossover is done and we can get back to Gotham business. B+

http://johnnybacardi.blogspot.com/2008/04/confessions-of-spinner-rack-junkie.html


CATWOMAN #77 - Yes, you probably have me as a sucker reader through Salvation Run, but that's it, okay?

http://comicbycomic.blogspot.com/2007/12/dc-comics-february-2008-solicits.html


Catwoman 77
I love the cover. The way Run Catwoman Run was worked in with the logo. The fact that the zipper on her suit was all the way up and she still looked sexy. The stark white, black, and red coloring. Adam Hughes does great covers. The story was fun, too, as Selina continues to live out her fantasy on an imaginary Earth, with Martian Manhunter getting through to her in time. Great stuff here.

http://shellyscomics.blogspot.com/2008/03/week-in-review.html